Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Books for Cooks: Zahav by Michael Solomonov

Books for Cooks: Zahav by Michael Solomonov


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Chef Michael Solomonov shares the food of his much acclaimed flagship Philadelphia restaurant in his first cookbook, Zahav. Though the book and the restaurant share the same name, this is not a glossy tome of “tackle this if you dare” cuisine. Zahav is an exploration of what Solomonov grew up eating and what he loves. Images include an overflowing dining room table (Israeli food is inherently family-style), an outdoor spice market, and old family photos—no sterile plated creations here.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

Sign up for our daily newsletter for more great articles and tasty, healthy recipes.

Just defining Israeli food is a considerable challenge: the influences on this New Jersey-sized country are so many and so varied, from Eastern European matzo balls to Persian rice to Bulgarian Burekas. Solomonov is a passionate teacher and guide. An entire chapter is devoted to tahina (the Hebrew pronunciation of the ground sesame paste). Yes, you’ll find a recipe for the hummus that will change your life. You’ll also learn how sesame seeds grow, the story of his favorite suppliers, and more ways to top the stuff than you could ever imagine.

Chapters are divided by dish type, each set off by a full-page spread of the dishes to come: a visual index of sorts that’s both gorgeous and user friendly. The hummus was complex, but easy to do with Solomonov’s careful yet high-spirited instruction. The result? Almost impossibly smooth, and so delicious.

To understand this food—intensely colorful, bright salads, deeply char-grilled vegetables and meats, and the tahina, oh the tahina—you have to read, and you have to cook. Then share with friends and family. It’s the Israeli way.

See More:


The Zahav Lamb Shoulder

Next to our hummus, this is the dish that put Zahav on the map. We brine a whole lamb shoulder and smoke it over hardwood for a couple of hours. Then we braise it in pomegranate molasses until the meat is tender enough to eat with a spoon. Finally, the lamb shoulder is finished in a hot oven to crisp up the exterior. This dish is the best of all possible worlds—smoky and crispy, soft and tender, sweet and savory—and it’s a celebration all by itself. The use of pomegranate in this dish (and the crispy rice we serve with it) is very Persian, which is a cuisine with tradition so rich it always makes me think of palaces and royal banquets.

Chickpeas, the underrated star of this dish, recall the humble chamin, a traditional Sabbath stew that’s slow-baked overnight. During the long braise, the lamb bones create a natural stock that is absorbed by the chickpeas, creating the richest, creamiest peas you’ve ever tasted. I’ve even made hummus with these chickpeas—totally decadent!

Preparing the lamb shoulder is a two- or three-day process and thus requires some advance planning. We go through about sixty shoulders a week at the restaurant, and it’s still not enough. If you’ve ever been disappointed at Zahav, chances are it’s because we didn’t have a lamb shoulder for you. Now, you can make it for yourself.

We smoke our lamb shoulders at Percy Street Barbecue. If you have a smoker, feel free to smoke the lamb. Or just roast the shoulder as the recipe indicates.


Michael Solomonov

James Beard Book of the Year and Best International Cookbook (2016) 

"After stints working with chef Marc Vetri in Philadelphia and as head chef at Marigold Kitchen, Solomonov developed a passion for Israeli cooking and his desire to show the full breadth of the cuisine began to take shape he started his own restaurant, Zahav, in Philadelphia in 2008. Six years later, he won the James Beard award for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic region. Solomonov shares his story as well as his wide-ranging approach to Israeli cuisine in this impressive collection of recipes that are sure to challenge readers’ preconceptions. In addition to kibbe, kugel, latke, and rugelach, Solomonov offers chicken albondigas, the Spanish tapas standard cashew baklava cigars and the Chocolate Almond Situation, his riff on the flourless chocolate cake. To these stunningly simple dishes he adds deliciously decadent fare such as duck and foie gras kebabs, and beluga lentil soup with marrow bones. Solomonov isn’t one for showmanship (or waste—the juices from his Israeli salad of cucumber, tomato, parsley and lemon are added to gin to create an unusual martini), and virtually all the book’s recipes are within the reach of novice cooks. The reader’s biggest challenge will likely be mastering the ubiquitous tehina sauce used as a foundation for hummus and as an accent in countless dishes. Readers with an adventurous palate and an open mind will be richly rewarded by this terrific debut." 

Publisher&aposs Weekly, starred review 

"Zahav’s modern approach to Israeli cooking makes for the kind of book that will redefine the conversation around Middle Eastern cuisine in America.” �TER.com 

�h of Michael Solomonov’s soulful recipes򠿮ls created by someone impassioned by one of the world&aposs most exciting cuisines – a master of his craft. I’m smitten!” — Gail Simmons, TV Host, author, Talking With My Mouth Full 

𠇌ooking is how Michael found himself, changed his life, and then the world around him. Michael writes that ‘nothing in my life happened the way it was supposed to.’  He means life in its beauty and its awful brutality. I think that his life and most importantly this book, is beshert, ‘meant to be.’ I believe his Zahav will be one of the most cherished books in years, with staggeringly delicious recipes from one of the brightest lights in our culinary world. I believe this book will be beshert for you too.” — Andrew Zimmern, chef, anthropologist, global thought leader 

“Zahav is the most honest chef’s cookbook I have read in a long time. Mike’s soulful depiction of his life delivers the same heart and intelligence that emanates from his restaurant. Zahav is essential reading for anyone who wants to make the food of Israel —or Philadelphia— today.” — Joan Nathan, author, The Foods of Israel Today 

“Zahav has become a staple of my Philly restaurant experience, but staples only hold pages down. Here at last are pages 𠅊nd pages — of Michael Solomonov’s thinking on food, community, and the recipes that get me back to Zahav every time.”  — Questlove  

“I’m excited to have Zahav, a compendium of Chef Solomonov’s recipes, so I can recreate them.” — David Lebovitz, author, My Paris Kitchen 

“The great thing about Michael Solomonov is that he simply cooks from his heart. With Zahav, he has developed perhaps one of the most innovative and thoughtful restaurants in America. After years of asking him for recipes, I&aposm relieved to finally have his book to answer all of my questions!” — Chef Marc Vetri 


Books for Cooks: Zahav by Michael Solomonov - Recipes

James Beard Award winner of Outstanding Restaurant (2019)  
James Beard Award winner of Outstanding Chef (2017)

James Beard Book of the Year and Best International Cookbook (2016)


The James Beard Award&ndashwinning chef and co-owner of Philadelphia's Zahav restaurant reinterprets the glorious cuisine of Israel for American home kitchens.

Ever since he opened Zahav in 2008, chef Michael Solomonov has been turning heads with his original interpretations of modern Israeli cuisine, attracting notice from the New York Times , Bon Appétit , ("an utter and total revelation") , and Eater ( "Zahav defines Israeli cooking in America"). 
Zahav showcases the melting-pot cooking of Israel, especially the influences of the Middle East, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Eastern Europe. Solomonov's food includes little dishes called mezze , such as the restaurant's insanely popular fried cauliflower a hummus so ethereal that it put Zahav on the culinary map and a pink lentil soup with lamb meatballs that one critic called "Jerusalem in a bowl."  It also includes a majestic dome of Persian wedding rice and a whole roasted lamb shoulder with pomegranate and chickpeas that's a celebration in itself. All Solomonov's dishes are brilliantly adapted to local and seasonal ingredients. 
Zahav tells an authoritative and personal story of how Solomonov embraced the food of his birthplace. With its blend of technique and passion, this book shows readers how to make his food their own.

Praise For Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking&hellip

James Beard Book of the Year and Best International Cookbook (2016)

"After stints working with chef Marc Vetri in Philadelphia and as head chef at Marigold Kitchen, Solomonov developed a passion for Israeli cooking and his desire to show the full breadth of the cuisine began to take shape he started his own restaurant, Zahav, in Philadelphia in 2008. Six years later, he won the James Beard award for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic region . Solomonov shares his story as well as his wide-ranging approach to Israeli cuisine in this impressive collection of recipes that are sure to challenge readers&rsquo preconceptions. In addition to kibbe, kugel, latke, and rugelach, Solomonov offers chicken albondigas, the Spanish tapas standard cashew baklava cigars and the Chocolate Almond Situation, his riff on the flourless chocolate cake. To these stunningly simple dishes he adds deliciously decadent fare such as duck and foie gras kebabs, and beluga lentil soup with marrow bones. Solomonov isn&rsquot one for showmanship (or waste&mdashthe juices from his Israeli salad of cucumber, tomato, parsley and lemon are added to gin to create an unusual martini), and virtually all the book&rsquos recipes are within the reach of novice cooks. The reader&rsquos biggest challenge will likely be mastering the ubiquitous tehina sauce used as a foundation for hummus and as an accent in countless dishes. Readers with an adventurous palate and an open mind will be richly rewarded by this terrific debut ."
&mdash Publisher's Weekly , starred review

" Zahav &rsquos modern approach to Israeli cooking makes for the kind of book that will redefine the conversation around Middle Eastern cuisine in America.&rdquo &mdash EATER.com

&ldquoEach of Michael Solomonov&rsquos soulful recipes feels created by someone impassioned by one of the world's most exciting cuisines &ndash a master of his craft. I&rsquom smitten!&rdquo &mdash  Gail Simmons, TV Host, author, Talking With My Mouth Full
 
&ldquoCooking is how Michael found himself, changed his life, and then the world around him. Michael writes that &lsquonothing in my life happened the way it was supposed to.&rsquo  He means life in its beauty and its awful brutality. I think that his life and most importantly this book, is  beshert , &lsquomeant to be.&rsquo I believe his Zahav will be one of the most cherished books in years, with staggeringly delicious recipes from one of the brightest lights in our culinary world. I believe this book will be beshert for you too.&rdquo &mdash Andrew Zimmern, chef, anthropologist, global thought leader
 
&ldquoZahav is the most honest chef&rsquos cookbook I have read in a long time. Mike&rsquos soulful depiction of his life delivers the same heart and intelligence that emanates from his restaurant.  Zahav is essential reading for anyone who wants to make the food of Israel &mdashor Philadelphia&mdash today.&rdquo &mdash Joan Nathan, author, The Foods of Israel Today
 
&ldquoZahav has become a staple of my Philly restaurant experience, but staples only hold pages down. Here at last are pages &mdashand pages &mdash of Michael Solomonov&rsquos thinking on food, community, and the recipes that get me back to Zahav every time.&rdquo  &mdash Questlove 
 
&ldquoI&rsquom excited to have Zahav, a compendium of Chef Solomonov&rsquos recipes, so I can recreate them.&rdquo &mdash David Lebovitz, author, My Paris Kitchen
 
&ldquoThe great thing about Michael Solomonov is that he simply cooks from his heart. With Zahav, he has developed perhaps one of the most innovative and thoughtful restaurants in America. After years of asking him for recipes, I'm relieved to finally have his book to answer all of my questions!&rdquo &mdash Chef Marc Vetri


The Best Cookbooks of the Century So Far

The Internet really ought to have killed cookbooks. Recipes—tidy, self-contained packets of information that for centuries were individually swapped and shared, indexed and catalogued—are ideally suited for digital transmission. As they migrated online, liberated from the printed and bound, multiplying giddily, the thousand-recipe doorstops and easy-weeknight omnibus editions that had, for so long, stood in hardcover at the end of the shelf closest to the stove were rendered obsolete. And that should have been the end of it.

Yet somehow cookbooks stuck around. In fact, as the rest of the book industry found itself in a post-millennial free fall, cookbooks were selling better than ever. This is because, coinciding with the rise of the Internet, cookbooks reinvented themselves. What once were primarily vehicles for recipes became anything but: the recipes still mattered, but now they existed in service of something more—a mood, a place, a technique, a voice. Cookbooks of the pre-Internet age remain essential, of course. (What would any kitchen be without the guiding voices of Madhur Jaffrey, Julia Child, Edna Lewis, Harold McGee, and a hundred others?) But, to my mind, the best cookbooks of the twenty-first century are among the very best ever written.

What follows is a list of my personal favorites from the beginning of the new millennium to the present. It’s a list that’s shaped by the particulars of how I eat, how I cook, and how I read, and its ten volumes—which include a profanity-filled restaurant scrapbook, a historiological cookbook of cookbooks, and a multi-thousand-page set of culinary lab notes—may not be the same that populate the Top Ten of any other cook. But what compels and delights me about my particular catalogue is that each book is, at heart, a text that teaches rather than dictates, that emphasizes cooking as a practice rather than as merely a means to a meal. They’re books that not only have great recipes and gorgeous images but take exuberant advantage of their form—subverting, reconsidering, and reframing the rules and limits of cookbook writing. If I’m stuck on what to make for dinner, I have only to Google some variation of “salmon arugula cast-iron easy.” For proof of what an extraordinary object a cookbook can be, I turn again and again to these.

“The River Cottage Cookbook,” by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (2001)

Changing one’s relationship with food “involves no sacrifice, no hardship or discomfort,” Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall writes, in his poetic ode to the hands-on, homestead-ish life. His prescription is simple: get in there and do it yourself—grow your own food, meet your meat, learn the colors and patterns of the landscape around you through all its seasons. Years before “farm to table” was a buzzword and Michael Pollan a household name, Fearnley-Whittingstall was urging readers to move away from industrial food systems and reacquaint themselves with lo-fi self-sufficiency: he will teach you how to cultivate your own berry brambles, trap your own eels (this is a very British book), and raise (and slaughter) your own pigs. The idea that pastoral practices can be pleasurable instead of burdensome is old news for the many home cooks today who know how to spot ramps in the wild and whip up D.I.Y. ricotta. But “The River Cottage Cookbook” ’s ideas (and straightforward, elegant recipes) remain striking reminders that what we eat isn’t just food on a plate but part of a thrilling natural cycle, our human lives brushing up against countless others, plant and animal alike.

“The Zuni Café Cookbook,” by Judy Rodgers (2002)

Since its introduction, in the late nineteen-eighties, the roast chicken served at San Francisco’s Zuni Café has earned a reputation as the best roast chicken in the world—crisp-skinned, impossibly juicy, served atop a salad of torn bread and bitter greens whose tart vinaigrette blends with the rich, golden drippings. That recipe alone would land this book on any list of the great and essential, but the rest of the volume has a magic, as well. Judy Rodgers got her culinary footing in France, living for a year with the family of the chef Jean Troisgros, and in Berkeley, where she cooked at Chez Panisse, and this five-hundred-page manifesto draws on those threads of experience (and others). The result is a remarkable collection of emphatic culinary opinions, several hundred of which are disguised as recipes: the merits of some soft cheeses over others, the precise way to dress a salad, the nonnegotiable importance of salting raw beef and fowl a day or more before it’s cooked. The book’s magnificent opening chapter, “What to Think About Before You Start, & While You Are Cooking,” lays out the philosophical blueprint for every New American and California-casual cookbook that followed.

“Baking: From My Home to Yours,” by Dorie Greenspan (2006)

It’s true, unfortunately, that the art of baking is more rigid and exacting than that of stovetop cooking. The whims of a search-engine algorithm won’t cut it if you want your biscuits perfectly fluffy, your cakes precisely lofty yet moist, and your cookies angelic a baker, more than any other cook, needs a recipe writer she can truly trust. To my mind, there is none more reliable than Dorie Greenspan, a lapsed academic who found her calling in cakes and pastries and built a career writing uncommonly precise road maps for replicating her success. With her as a guide, there is no room for self-destructive improvisation: her stylish, rigorous, cheerful recipes work because she tells her reader exactly how to make them work, anticipating our errors and our questions, building contingencies, alternatives, and solutions right into the text, and evincing a soothing flexibility. (If the ganache at the bottom of a layered pudding spills up the sides of the cup, “it’s pretty if it doesn't, the chocolate will be a surprise.”) And if you only have one Greenspan book, it should be this one, a masterwork spanning breakfast to midnight snacks—not to mention her famous World Peace Cookies.

“Momofuku,” by David Chang and Peter Meehan (2009)

For many accomplished restaurant chefs, authoring a cookbook is just another checkbox on the to-do list of culinary celebrity, something to fit in after headlining a charity auction but before doing a stint on reality TV. Accordingly, countless celebrity-chef cookbooks consist of little more than dinner-party recipes sprinkled with pleasantly superficial biography. David Chang, whose Momofuku restaurants blew up American restaurant culture and then rebuilt it again in a decidedly hipper, more global, more postmodern form, did something similarly upending with his Momofuku book. Co-written with Peter Meehan, who later became Chang’s collaborator on the now-defunct food magazine Lucky Peach, the book is sometimes brilliantly cookable—see the dazzlingly effective method for cast-iron ribeye, or the near-instant ginger-scallion sauce, which tastes good on almost anything. Other times, by design, it is absolutely impossible, outlining finicky and complex recipes that are best suited for a brigade of swaggering line cooks. (I love the headline for the frozen foie-gras torchon, which advises you not to make the dish.) Throughout the volume, Chang spends time grappling with what was, at the time, the central drama of his career: initially the proud outsider, devoted to rejecting the restaurant world’s stodgy establishment, Momofuku’s culinary subversion was so forceful (and so appealing) that it became an establishment of its own.


Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking

By Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook

Rating: Three forks.

Our star ratings are based on a four fork system. The Epicurious Cookbook Canon serves as the standard-bearer for what four fork books should be.

Can't get enough Epicurious cookbook reviews? Like our Cookbook Critic Facebook page for all of our cookbook coverage, teasers for upcoming reviews, new release news, and much more.


A world of Israeli cooking from Zahav chef Michael Solomonov

Put down that plastic container of hummus and back away from the fridge. Michael Solomonov, the star Philadelphia chef and author of the cookbook “Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking,” has a better idea: Make it yourself. His new volume, which is part memoir and part guidebook to the vibrant flavors of the Middle East, gives home cooks the tools they need to make those dazzling chickpea dips, among many other mouthwatering dishes, from scratch.

“The flavor is totally different,” he said of homemade hummus, of which he offers recipes for seven variations — everything from the classic tahini-laced mousse to a decadent warm lemon-butter-garlic mash.

“It doesn’t taste like you’ve cracked it open out of a fridge, like you’ve ripped the plastic lid off it.”

Solomonov, who was born in Israel but lived in the U.S. from ages 2 to 15, rose to prominence when he opened Zahav in 2008 with business partner Steven Cook. The Philadelphia restaurant electrified critics and foodies with its take on modern Israeli cuisine, which reflects an amalgam of cultures and flavors that coexist in one geographically tiny melting pot. In 2011, Solomonov picked up the James Beard Award for Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic.

In “Zahav,” readers are privy not only to Solomonov’s techniques and passionate advocacy for ingredients (there is an entire chapter devoted to sesame paste), but to his personal struggles and triumphs. Alongside recipes, he shares memories of his family, hints of his “tendency toward addiction” and writes of his intense grief over the death of his brother, an Israel Defense Forces soldier killed by sniper fire. The book, which he co-wrote with Cook, would be “less interesting without our context,” he said.

“He’s a little bit under the radar for how great he really is,” said Gavin Kaysen, chef and owner of Minneapolis’ Spoon and Stable, who befriended Solomonov about five years ago in New York. “He has a lot of restaurants in Philadelphia he does extremely well his food is delicious, and he has an incredible story of what he’s beaten in terms of addiction, an incredible feat on its own. It’s been great to see where he’s taken himself.”

Now, Solomonov is taking his food on the road. To promote the release of “Zahav,” he is cooking in his friends’ kitchens all over the country — including Kaysen’s. He’ll be in the kitchen at Spoon and Stable for a small dinner on Nov. 4. Limited tickets are still available.

This marks his first visit to the Twin Cities, but he is well aware of what’s been going on here, food-wise. “You guys are the Number 1 food city in the universe now,” he said.

As a chef whose fame grew outside the closely watched petri dish that is the New York City restaurant scene, he can understand why chefs such as his friend Kaysen are thriving in other parts of the country that are more accessible, with cheaper housing and better quality of life.

“That seems to be the trend right now, mostly because New York food writers and chefs are finally moving out of New York,” he said. “When we opened Zahav, we thought we would maybe end up in New York opening another Zahav, and it’s great that we don’t have to do that.”

And now everyone can eat his food, regardless of location. “Zahav” breaks down Solomonov’s spin on Israeli cuisine into concepts and ideas rather than courses. One chapter deals exclusively in salatim , or salads — little vegetable dishes that kick off an Israeli meal another focuses on meze — small plates with big flavor. The chapter that goes “beyond chicken soup” introduces many Americans to a maple-syrup-scented Yemenite beef soup thickened with fenugreek.

Then, there’s the aforementioned chapter devoted entirely to tehina , the Hebrew word for tahini, a ground sesame paste. Tehina is the foundation for classic hummus, a drizzle for meats, a binder for salads and a unique basis for candies and confections. Solomonov is practically a tehina evangelist. He calls it the “No. 1” defining element of Israeli cuisine.

“That’s the rich and the creamy of Israeli cooking,” he said. It provides a dairy-like element in a cuisine that largely avoids mixing dairy with meat because of Jewish dietary laws. Adapting to those restrictions is what sets Israeli food apart from other Middle Eastern cuisines, he argues.

Most restaurants in Israel are kosher “from a marketability standpoint,” he said. “You don’t see bacon on every menu, even though bacon is there. And there are burger restaurants that don’t have any sort of religious ideology they just don’t serve cheese. They want to hit the whole market.” So when a meat dish calls for something creamy, tehina is the answer, he said.

Other common ingredients in Israeli cuisine are harder to find here — smoky Urfa pepper that tops his recipe for Turkish hummus baharat , a Middle Eastern pumpkin-pie-like spice blend pomegranate molasses, which he ate as a child with tehina like a PB&J. Some of the spice mixtures and condiments are easy enough to assemble, but they do mean an extra step before any of the delicious results can hit your mouth. Their inclusion in the recipes was deliberate, Solomonov said.

“We want the food to be accessible and not mysterious, not behind this veil of Middle Eastern cooking [like] ‘This is so foreign to me,’ ” he said. “Everything is physically accessible and the cooking is quite simple. We just try to take away some of the cultural barriers.”

He admits some recipes will be daunting to the home cook, such as charcoal-fired meats that can’t be cooked indoors, and an extravagant lamb shoulder that the restaurant smokes in smokers from Texas. But everything is adaptable in cooking, he said.

“Consistency in our restaurant with professional chefs, with me here all the time, is the biggest issue we have,” he said. “So putting something on paper, giving it to somebody else and saying, ‘This is how you’re going to do it,’ you’re always subject to change and reinterpretation. But we have guidelines for everything, and hopefully people will be OK with [messing] things up.

“That’s how you come up with great things,” he added. “You make mistakes.”


Recipe Summary

  • 1 1/2 pounds large Italian eggplants, peeled and cut crosswise into 1-inch-thick rounds
  • Kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 large red peppers, thinly sliced
  • 1 large Spanish onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon sweet smoked paprika
  • 1/4 cup sherry vinegar
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Line a large rimmed baking sheet with paper towels. Arrange the eggplant slices in a single layer on the paper towels and sprinkle them with salt. Let stand for 1 hour. Pat the eggplant dry with paper towels.

In a large skillet, heat 1/3 cup of the vegetable oil until shimmering. Add half of the eggplant and cook over moderately high heat, turning once, until browned and tender, about 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the eggplant to fresh paper towels to drain. Repeat with the remaining 1/3 cup of vegetable oil and eggplant.

Add the peppers, onion and garlic to the skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in the paprika and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Return the eggplant to the skillet, stir gently to coat and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the sherry vinegar and simmer for 1 minute. Remove from the heat. Stir in the parsley and lemon juice and season with salt. Let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until lightly chilled, about 20 minutes, before serving.


Recipe Summary

  • 1/2 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts
  • 1 cup tahini (such as Soom)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (from 2 lemons)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 ice cube
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 500°F. Toss together brussels sprouts, oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt on a large rimmed baking sheet. Spread in a single layer, and roast in preheated oven until tender and lightly charred, about 12 minutes. Transfer to a plate to cool. Reduce oven temperature to 300°F.

Spread hazelnuts on a large rimmed baking sheet, and bake at 300°F until golden and skins wrinkle, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a clean kitchen towel, and rub off skins. Let stand until cool enough to handle coarsely chop.

Place tahini, lemon juice, cumin, ice cube, half of the cooled brussels sprouts, and remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt in a food processor. Process until ice melts and a chunky paste forms. With processor running, add 1/2 cup cold water in a slow, steady stream, processing until mixture is emulsified and resembles the texture of hummus. Season to taste with salt.

To serve, spread tahini mixture on a platter, and top with remaining brussels sprouts. Garnish with hazelnuts, chopped parsley, and a generous drizzle of olive oil.


Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking

It’s difficult to categorize Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook’s “Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking”. Full of family history and personal anecdotes, the book reads like a memoir, liberally sprinkled with recipes and descriptions of ingredients. With glossy pages and bright color photographs, the spices and prepared dishes practically leap off the page to conquer your taste buds. It’s such a beautifully produced book that it almost deserves to be displayed on a coffee table more than subject to the wear and tear of a busy and messy kitchen.

In “Zahav”, Solomonov and Cook present a trailblazing understanding of Israeli food and culture. While it includes renditions of such staples as challah, brisket, honey cake, and rugelach, this is not your grandmother’s Jewish cookbook. Unless your grandmother lived in Palestine before Israel became a state, and had incorporated all of the local Mediterranean and Middle Eastern influences into her cooking, along with strong contributions from Europe, North Africa, North America, and everywhere else that would send emigrants to Israel over the next 70 years. The result in an incredibly vibrant cuisine, one that celebrates the diversity of the Israeli experience and opportunity of incorporating multiple food traditions into one kitchen, if not quite into a single melting pot.

The one culinary nod to specifically Jewish cooking is the authors use a few basic kosher regulations to establish their definition of Israeli cuisine. None of the recipes as written in this book are made with pork or shellfish, and none include both meat and dairy. They are clear that this decision is not the result of a religious conviction, but that it is one way to differentiate Israeli food from Greek, Turkish, Syrian and other similar and neighborly dishes.

Readers and cooks who have traveled in Israel will easily relate to Solomonov’s stories, although his tone sometimes veers unnecessarily towards the brash. The explanations of ingredients, especially the elevation of the humble sesame seed and magnification of the wonders of schmaltz, are informative and fun. As is to be expected in such a trendy book, the endless focus on fresh and even select (and very pricey) ingredients eventually becomes tiresome.

This book will be loved by the ambitious cook with deep pockets and time to experiment in the kitchen. Those with close connections to the land of Israel will enjoy the personalized and sensual tour of the country’s history, people, landscape, tastes, and smells.
Everyone will love the gorgeous photographs, but many will not find frequent occasion to use it to cook.

Exactly how useful this book is as a cookbook will be covered in Part B of this review… stay tuned for the report on the Israeli feast! It’s time to make some hummus.


Watch the video: Michael Solomonov and Steve Cook. Israeli Soul: Easy, Essential, Delicious (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Dogami

    You are very talented people

  2. Daeg

    Well done, your idea is brilliant

  3. Jantis

    It is true! The idea of ??good support.

  4. Hartford

    As for me, the meaning is revealed further nowhere, the afftor has done the maximum, for which I respect him!

  5. Sen

    I think you have confused.

  6. Deverell

    Thank you for your assistance in this matter, now I know.

  7. Mikinos

    Bravo, this brilliant phrase will come in handy

  8. Primeiro

    I think he is wrong. Let us try to discuss this. Write to me in PM.



Write a message