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Khoresht Lubia Sabz (Persian Green Bean Stew)

Khoresht Lubia Sabz (Persian Green Bean Stew)

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons ghee
  • 1 Cup onion, diced
  • ¼ Teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 Pound stew meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • ½ Teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ Teaspoon pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¼ Cup sun-dried tomatoes, packed in olive oil, chopped
  • 2 Cups beef broth
  • 1 Pound green beans, stems removed and cut into 1 ½-inch pieces
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Directions

Heat a skillet with a lid over medium-high heat. Add the ghee. Add the onions and cook until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and turmeric and mix well. Season the meat with the salt and pepper. Add to the skillet and brown on all sides. Add the tomato paste and sun-dried tomatoes, and mix well. Add the broth, cover and simmer on low for 1 hour. Add the green beans and lemon juice, and simmer for an additional 30 minutes uncovered, until green beans are soft but not soggy.

Nutritional Facts

Servings4

Calories Per Serving288

Folate equivalent (total)56µg14%

Riboflavin (B2)0.5mg27.1%


Khoresh-e Ghormeh Sabzi (Persian Herb, Bean and Lamb Stew)

Con Poulos for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews. Prop Stylist: Paige Hicks.

There are three essential elements to this khoresh, or stew, which is often called Iran’s national dish. First, the sweet, pungent flavor of dried or fresh fenugreek leaves defines the stew, which simply isn’t the same without it. Likewise, Omani limes (also known as dried Persian limes) add a distinct aged sourness that is vital to the dish. Finally, the classic Persian technique of sautéing a mountain of finely minced herbs lends character and complexity to the foundation of the stew. Don’t be afraid to really cook down the herbs until quite dark and dry this step is essential to concentrate their flavor.


Persian Beef and Green Bean Stew (Khoresht Lubia Sabz)

A beautifully fragrant and easy to make Persian stew.

  • 2 lbs stewing beef, cut into 1" cubes
  • 1 large onion
  • 6 cloves garlic. minced
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 large ripe tomatoes, chopped (or one 28 oz can, drained)
  • 1 6 oz can of tomato paste
  • 2 tsp advieh
  • 3 cups fresh green beans, trimmed and chopped into 1" pieces
  • 3 red potatoes, cut into bite sized chunks
  • roasted peanuts (optional garnish)
  • fresh parsley (optional garnish)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • salt and pepper to season beef and to taste

Season beef cubes well with salt and pepper and set aside.

Heat olive oil in large saucepan over medium high heat.

Add onion to the saucepan and fry until translucent and just about to change colour.

Add beef and fry with onion until browned on all sides.

Add minced garlic and fry for about 1 minute.

Add advieh and stir to thoroughly coat all ingredients.

Add water and bring to the boil. Turn down to a simmer. Simmer for 1 hour, covered.

After 1 hour, add tomatoes and tomato sauce. Let simmer for 20 minutes, covered.

Add potatoes and let simmer for 20 minutes, covered.

Add green beans, and let simmer a further 20 minutes, partly covered.

If the sauce needs to be thickened, remove cover completely and turn heat to medium high to reduce for a few minutes. Test potatoes for tenderness and serve over basmati rice.

Optional: Garnish with peanuts and fresh parsley.

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Summery Green Bean and Tomato Khoresht (stew)

Successful Persian rice deserves a lovely Khoresht ladled over it. The farmer’s markets are bursting with local tomatoes and green beans, so it is only natural to choose the Khoresht lubia sabz, or Persian green bean stew. This stew is hearty, with warm spices and a good amount of snap from fresh green beans. Choose a protein to add I used chicken breast. This recipe is inspired by Najmieh K. Batmanglij’s recipe, Khoresh-e lubia sabz, from “A Taste of Persia” cookbook. The best compliment I received was when The Hubs walked in the door and declared, “it smells like an Iranian kitchen in here!” Also, he had two helpings, another sure sign of success. I love feeding this man.

Do This: Wash the tomatoes. Cut a small “x” on the smooth end of each tomato.

Boil 8 cups of water in a pot and drop the tomatoes in the boiling water for 15 seconds. Prepare a bowl of ice water and plunge the tomatoes in the ice bath for a few moments after boiling. Remove tomatoes from the ice bath and peel the “x” points previously cut with a paring knife. The tomatoes will peel easily. Cut the tomatoes in half and use your thumbs to push out the seeds. Puree with an immersion blender or regular blender.

no canned tinny tomato taste here!

It’s khoresht time! Let’s make your Meemaw proud. In a medium non-stick pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium and sauté the green beans for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and reserve beans to the side. In a dutch oven (or medium pot), heat remaining teaspoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté 5 minutes or until onions are translucent. Add the garlic and chicken and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until browned. Add turmeric, cinnamon, a few cranks of salt and pepper and sauté one minute more. Add the green beans, tomato purée and tomato paste, lime juice, and 2 tablespoons of the saffron water to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Let simmer for at least 30 minutes or up to an hour an a half. Taste and add more salt, pepper, and lime juice if needed. Serve over your perfect Persian rice with a side of mast o khiar (mix yogurt with diced cucumbers, salt, pepper, and dill or mint) and shirazi salad.

Cook time: 30 minutes up to 1 1/2 hours
Print This Recipe!
Ingredients (serves 4 people):

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 lb fresh green beans, trimmed into 1″ pieces
  • 2 small vidalia onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, zested
  • 1 lb boneless chicken breast, cut into 1″ chunks (or whatever meat-lamb, beef, veal-you choose)
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 8-10 roma tomatoes, peeled, de-seeded, and puréed
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground saffron threads ground into powder and dissolved into 2 tablespoons warm water
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Wash the tomatoes and cut a small “x” on the smooth end of each one. Boil 8 cups of water in a pot and drop the tomatoes in the boiling water for 15 seconds. Prepare a bowl of ice water and plunge the tomatoes in the ice bath for a few moments after boiling. Remove tomatoes from the ice bath and peel the “x” points previously cut with a paring knife. Cut the tomatoes in half and use your thumbs to push out the seeds. Puree with an immersion blender or regular blender.

In a medium non-stick pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium and sauté the green beans for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and reserve beans to the side. In a dutch oven (or medium pot), heat remaining teaspoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté 5 minutes or until onions are translucent. Add the garlic and chicken and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until browned.

Once chicken is browned, add turmeric, cinnamon, a few cranks of salt and pepper and sauté one minute more. Add the green beans, tomato purée and tomato paste, lime juice, and 2 tablespoons of the saffron water to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer.

Let simmer for at least 30 minutes or up to an hour an a half. Taste and add more salt, pepper, and lime juice if needed. Serve over your perfect Persian rice with a side of mast o khiar (mix yogurt with diced cucumbers, salt, pepper, and dill or mint) and shirazi salad.


Khoresht Lubia Sabz (Persian Green Bean Stew) - Recipes

Fresh green beans are best when they are in season during the summer. Where I live, however, I can buy them all year round yet I still prefer buying the frozen packages which are already cleaned and cut, it saves a little time. Have you noticed that there are no more strings in string beans? Whatever happened to them? I guess the same thing that happened to the watermelon seeds over the years! Wasn't it annoying to remove all those strings one by one? Cleaning string beans used to be one of the chores that I didn't care much about at all. It wasn't easy to take hold of the tip of the string and pull it down the side all the way to the end without breaking it in at least two places. Compared to that cleaning the rest of the vegetables seemed relatively easy.

Kookoo Loobia Sabz - Green Beans Kookoo

  1. Heat oil in a small frying pan on medium heat. Add the onion slices, saute until golden, add turmeric, and stir. Add chopped garlic and saute for another 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. If using fresh green beans, remove the ends and wash. If using frozen beans leave them out to thaw and rinse.
  3. Place green beans and 1/2 cup of water in a medium-size pan and bring to a boil. Add a pinch of salt and cook for 5-7 minutes on medium heat until they soften. Remove from heat, drain and let it cool.
  4. Chop up the green beans and the green bell pepper finely if you like a smooth kookoo. I leave them somewhat coarse. It all depends on your taste. You may also chop the vegetables before steaming them but I find the process to be easier afterward. I use a food processor and pulse it a few times for each batch.
  5. In a large mixing bowl combine green beans, green pepper, sauteed onion and garlic, flour, eggs, olive oil, saffron, lemon juice, red pepper, salt and black pepper. Mix well.
  6. Pour the mixture into an oven-proof serving dish, cover loosely with a foil, and place in the 350 degrees preheated oven for about 45-50 minutes. Remove the foil in the last 20 minutes.

8 comments:

oh wow, thats a new way to cook beans. very interesting way too, must give it a try, have a nice week end

mmm love it, azita joon. and i love the photos you have taken. am a huge kuku fan- this is great as a side dish, too, as you have rightly pointed out. x shayma

Green beans are definitely worth the time. I've never had them prepared this way but they certainly seem delicious!

Wow, looks fantastic! Loving the blog too -- found you through The Spice Spoon and am eager to try some of your recipes.

Love that kookoo I love kookoos so much especially with the turmeric and saffron added how interesting that you add chickpea flour! I will try this version.

I made it today and it was exquisite, though I used red bell pepper to add a touch of color.
Great blog.


Recipe: Khoresht Loobia Sabz, Green Bean Stew

Photo Credits: Nora Farahdel / Aggie. Khoresht Loobia Sabz, or green bean stew, is a popular Persian dish that can be served separately or over a bed of rice.

A step-by-step recipe for a vibrant Perisan dish

Khoresht Loobia Sabz, Farsi for Green Bean Stew, is a popular dish that can be found in the center of many Persian dinner tables. Persian food is full of spices and vegetables, mainly rice and stews, and this recipe is no exception. With its tangy taste, it is based in a tomato broth and showcases the main ingredients of green beans, eggplant and beef. While this recipe only includes the stew, it is usually served on top of white rice.

This recipe is authentic, passed down by generations and shared by my mother, who grew up in Iran. Persian food goes hand-in-hand with culture, it commemorates the past and is the center of tradition. Family is an integral part of this tradition, and since most Persian meals are eaten among family, the following recipe serves around eight to 10 people. So, try something new, and share some with your family — it could just be a new favorite!


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons curry powder
  • 5 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 pound fresh green beans, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 3 cups uncooked basmati rice, rinsed and drained
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Heat a large nonstick pan (one that has a lid) over medium-high heat. Cook and stir beef until browned and crumbly, 5 to 7 minutes drain and discard grease. Stir in onion and jalapeno, and cook until tender. Season with curry powder stir in chicken broth and tomato sauce. Bring to a boil, and stir in green beans. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until beans are tender, about 15 minutes.

Stir in rice, and cover the pan. Cook on medium heat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until much of the liquid is absorbed. (Be careful not to overcook rice at this point or the dish will be mushy the rice should be firm.) Transfer everything in the pan to a bowl or heatproof container, and return pot to the stove.

Heat the oil in the nonstick pan over medium heat. Carefully dump the cooked rice mixture back into the pan. Wrap a clean dish towel around the inside of the pot's lid (the ends of the dish towel will be folded over the edges on top of the lid,) and put the lid on the pot. Cook over medium-low heat for 35 minutes, without uncovering or stirring. Remove lid and place a tray on top of the pot, then carefully flip it over. The rice will hold the shape of the pot and have a nice crust on top called 'tah digh.'


GHORMEH SABZI – PERSIAN HERB STEW


If you ask any Iranian to name some of their favorite foods, Khoresh Ghormeh Sabzi would be on the top of that list. I could honestly say not too many khoreshs (Persian stew served with rice) can match the unanimous popularity of Ghormeh Sabzi.

The name Ghormeh Sabzi translates to fried herb stew, but the herbs are not really fried, just sauteed on high temperature for a few minutes then mixed with the rest of the ingredients. The picture above shows the herbs for Ghormeh Sabzi plus, radishes. The reason that I photographed them together is that the same herbs plus some additional herbs such as basil, tarragon, mint, summer savory and dill sprigs are mixed together and are called Sabzi Khordan which is basically an assortment of fresh herbs and radishes that is eaten as a preferred side dish with many Persian foods.

So usually when I’m shopping for Ghormeh Sabzi I buy some extra parsley and cilantro and of course, radishes. I use the top white part of the scallions (the greens are for the khoresh), the top tender leaves and stems of cilantro and parsley, and the radishes to make Sabzi Khordan and serve it on the side with this all time Persian herb stew.
This khoresh is called Sabzi Ghorma in Azeri and it is cooked with some slight variations in different parts of Iran. For example my family who are Tabrizi (From Tabriz) cook the Sabzi Ghorma with a little tomato paste and quartered tomatoes, which usually are not used in other parts of Iran. Another difference could be the type of beans, which can be pinto beans (my mom used this), kidney beans, or black-eyed peas which is less common but I remember eating it at some dinner parties when I was growing up in Tabriz. All of these beans taste good in Ghormeh Sabzi, it just depends on which one each family uses by tradition. The other difference is whether or not shanbalileh (fenugreek) is used in Ghormeh Sabzi. Opinions are divided on this, some love shanbalileh, but some truly dislike it. The most commonly used herbs are tareh (which is a type of narrow flat leaved chives, but since it is not readily available in most states I have substituted it with sliced scallion greens), parsley (flat leaf or curly), and cilantro. Another visible difference is that in some parts of Iran the herbs are chopped fine and this gives the Ghormeh Sabzi a dark green look. But no matter where you eat this amazing herb stew, one thing is for certain, it is going to be amazing!

The herbs are picked through, chopped and sliced, then soaked in water. The meat is cooked in the pressure cooker, then the rest of the ingredients have been added to the meat in the pressure cooker and cooked for a very short time. This is the technique that I’ve come to love in the last few years. I used to cook the Ghormeh Sabzi in a regular pot before, but this is faster and in my opinion the flavors blend better and the result is a very delicious Ghormeh Sabzi that is ready in a fraction of time. However I will also give you the instructions for the regular pot technique in my notes.

Pierce 4 of the dried limes (limoo amani) with a knife or a fork and crush the other 4, discard the pits and add all of the limoo amani to the pressure cooker with the cooked beef and rest of the ingredients and cook for only 5 minutes after the pressure regulator starts rattling.

Transfer the content of the pressure cooker back to the skillet. At this point the ingredients are cooked through and the hard limoo amani is tender, but the khoresh still needs to simmer with some tomatoes a bit more to be Sabzi Ghorma (Azeri Ghormeh Sabzi). You may leave out the tomatoes if you wish.

Enjoy the Ghormeh Sabzi with tomatoes, OR

without!

Over the White Steamed Rice,

and Yogurt Saffron Tahdig, the best bottom of any pot of rice!!


Ingredients you need

  • Beef stew meat: I used 1-inch chunks of London broil for this stew, but you can also use bone-in beef or lamb shanks. You can also make it with bone in chicken.
  • Green unripe plums: The star of this stew are the sour green plums (gojeh sabz). They are typically available here in the US in middle eastern markets in April and May. They bring the sour that Persians love. You can adjust the sourness by adding more or less plums to the stew. If you want more sour flavor, you can also add lemon juice.
  • Fresh herbs: I am a proponent of using fresh parsley and mint and not dried herbs. They offer more flavor and texture to the stew as compared to their dried counterparts.
  • Onion: You can use a brown, white or yellow onion.
  • Beef broth: Some people add water to their stew, but I prefer to add beef broth for more flavor.
  • Extra virgin olive oil: Oil is needed to sauté the vegetables and meat. You can also use a neutral vegetable oil.
  • Seasonings: Salt, pepper and turmeric

Khoreshe Aloo Esfenaj | Persian Spinach and Plum Stew

Khoreshte Aloo Esfenaj is one of the best Persian Stews ever. This Persian stew is one of the tastiest dishes ever and it is usually made in Persian gatherings. This spinach and plum stew is absolutely delicious.

The ingredients used in this dish is are very healthy and nourishing. Spinach for example, is rich in Iron. This vegetable is a necessary ingredient that vegetarians can used as a meat alternative. This vegetable is also a great source for vitamin A and calcium.

plum keeps anxiety away from you. So, are you wasting your treasured time with anxiety and stress? Plum can be your cure. This fruit is very beneficial yet delicious, what can be better than that?

This stew is very traditional and is made in both ways, whether with meat or meatless. If you are a vegetarian here is a good news for you! Make this delicious Persian stew and have fun with it.

If you want to learn more about Persian stews like spinach and plum, go for Torshi Tareh and Khoresh Karafs.


Watch the video: Persian Green Beans Rice - Loobiya Polo لوبیا پلو #shorts (October 2021).