Pies-N-Thighs Biscuits



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To make ahead, freeze the cut-out biscuits in plastic bags. Bake frozen, increasing cooking time to 45–55 minutes.

Ingredients

  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 5½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more
  • 1½ cups (3 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1½ cups chilled buttermilk
  • 1 large egg, beaten to blend

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 375°. Pulse baking powder, salt, sugar, baking soda, and 5½ cups flour in a food processor. Add butter and pulse until the texture of coarse meal with a few pea-size pieces of butter remaining.

  • Transfer mixture to a large bowl. Mix in buttermilk with a fork, then gently knead just until a shaggy dough comes together.

  • Pat out dough on a lightly floured surface until 1¼” thick. Cut out biscuits with a 3” biscuit cutter, rerolling scraps once.

  • Place biscuits on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush tops with egg. Bake until golden brown, 30–35 minutes.

Recipe by Pies-n-Thighs, Brooklyn, NYC,

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 610 Fat (g) 34 Saturated Fat (g) 21 Cholesterol (mg) 120 Carbohydrates (g) 64 Dietary Fiber (g) 1 Total Sugars (g) 5 Protein (g) 11 Sodium (mg) 900Reviews Section

Cake Is The Only Thing That Matters

If you know me, you know that sandwiches are my favorite food (some people find this controversial, but it’s valid, the end). Every year I look for a new favorite sandwich of the year, and a few years ago I discovered the chicken biscuit from Pies n Thighs in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It’s a juicy piece of boneless fried chicken on a biscuit that’s been slathered with honey butter and doused in hot sauce. It is, in a word, glorious. I’ve been missing it since going gluten free, so I decided to try to recreate it without the gluten. And…
It was surprisingly easy, and tasted exactly like the real version! Even if you’ve never had the real thing, this is a great impressive meal to make, and you’ll be sorry when you’ve finished your last bite. (And if you want the glutens, just use regular breadcrumbs!)

Pies n Thighs Chicken Biscuit Recipe [Copycat version]
Ingredients for the Marinade
1 package boneless, skinless chicken thighs (mine had 4)
2 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons sriracha or other hot sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne
1 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp black pepper

Ingredients for Breading
3/4 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs
3/4 cup almond meal (if you’re making these with gluten, you can use all breadcrumbs, but I’d recommend using almond meal anyway as it adds a great flavor)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne
1 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 to 1/2 tsp amounts of any other dried herbs you like (I added some basil and oregano)
olive oil

Ingredients for Serving
gluten-free biscuits, rolls, or English muffins, halved and toasted (I recommend the Trader Joe’s French rolls)
4 tbsp salted butter, room temperature
2 tbsp honey
hot sauce of your choice (like Frank’s Red Hot or Cholula)

For the marinade: pour buttermilk into a large (non-metal) bowl. Add in hot sauce, mustard, salt, cayenne, paprika, and pepper and whisk together until well mixed. Set aside. Take your chicken thighs out of the package, trim any fat, and pound them out a bit thinner between pieces of plastic wrap. Submerge chicken in buttermilk mixture, making sure it’s completely covered, and let marinate in the fridge for at least 3 hours and up to 24, stirring things around once or twice.

When you’re ready to cook: in a large plate, mix together breadcrumbs, almond meal, salt, cayenne, thyme, pepper, garlic powder, and any other herbs with a fork until well distributed. Take each piece of chicken out of the buttermilk, let the excess drip off, and then dredge in crumb mixture until both sides are coated.

Heat enough olive oil to more than comfortably coat the bottom of your pan over medium heat. When it’s hot enough (toss in some breadcrumbs and they’ll sizzle), cook chicken–probably in batches of two so as not to overcrowd your pan–until browned on both sides and cooked through, about 5 minutes per side. (When flipping chicken, use a thin metal spatula to ensure that coating comes with the chicken.) While chicken cooks, mix together honey and butter in a small bowl until combined.

When ready to serve, divide honey butter between rolls. Top bottom half with chicken, douse with hot sauce to taste (more is better), and top with other half. Grab a lot of napkins, and dig in.


Tag Archives: pies-n-thighs biscuits

So yesterday was for a basic fried chicken sandwich from Cook’s Country, which was very tasty. Today is something that is just as easy, might taste even better and is a little more homemade. The recipe id for fried chicken biscuits and is from Bon Appetit, who got the recipe from the Pies-N-Thighs restaurant in Brooklyn, New York. The recipe sounded too good to pass up – delicate and spicy fried chicken on a nice fluffy homemade biscuit with honey butter. How could you not at least give it a try?

Fried Chicken Biscuits

For the Biscuits:

3 teaspoons baking powder
2½ teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon baking soda
5½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more
1½ cups (3 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1½ cups chilled buttermilk
1 large egg, beaten to blend
For the Honey Butter and Assembly:

½ cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
¼ cup honey
½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus more
Vegetable oil, for frying about 2½ cups
2 cups panko Japanese breadcrumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
4 Pies-N-Thighs Biscuits (recipe above)
Hot sauce, for serving


Brooklyn Soulfood Joint Pies N’ Thighs Moves to Manhattan

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Originally a tiny beer storage closet in Williamsburg, Pies N’ Thighs has earned its title as an award-winning restaurant for authentic southerners and hipster northerners alike. With fresh ingredients and house-baked breads and pastries inspired by the slow food movement, Pies has been serving up some of the heartiest soul food in NYC since 2006.

Voted the best doughnut, apple pie, biscuits, and fried chicken in New York, it’s safe to say that this place is pretty unmatched. And it actually just got better (and closer).

Not only is this Brooklyn gem still serving up fried goodness on the other side of the water, but they recently have a new spot in Manhattan on the Lower East Side. Tucked away in a corner of Chinatown on Canal Street, the new joint has a fresher feel. They are serving up the same menu items as in BK, also with the addition of a few new dishes that my dining buddies and I were SO excited to try.

When we walked into the newly renovated restaurant, we immediately took in the wooden booths, authentic southern tiled floors, open-line kitchen, and the original counter stools sported in the Brooklyn location 10 years ago. The smell in Pies N’ Thighs is an intoxicating mixture of their famous fried food and plain old southern comfort, which we definitely couldn’t complain about.

We gawked at the menu while our smiley and attentive waiter started us with biscuits with honey butter and hot pepper jelly to share. When you go, be sure to order some of Pies N’ Thighs’ most popular items: the thick and spicy mac n’ cheese side, classic chicken n’ waffles served with cinnamon butter and maple cranberry sauce, the creamy sausage gravy, killer home fries with rosemary and cilantro, or, my personal favorite, the “hippie banjo” (egg, hippie cheddar, avocado, tomato, sprouts, and mayo on house baked toasted anadama bread).

And, don’t forget, THE BISCUITS. If everyone in the world ate one I’m almost positive we’d attain world peace because everyone would be too happy to fight. Start preparing your appetite for this weekend’s brunch plans, because you are in for a feast of indulgence. A fulfilling southern meal is just a (shorter) subway ride away.

Seriously? You haven’t tried chicken and waffles yet? Check this out:


Pies ‘n’ Thighs

Fried chicken, our new New York City food obsession. Okay, not particularly new, especially as many of the better places have been around awhile, but lots of new restaurants specializing in deep-fried bird have been opening lately, replacing, say, cupcakes, or artisanal pizzas as the food of the moment.

Pies ‘n’ Thighs has been around for several years, existing as a kind of outdoor open-secret thing until the Department of Health got around to shutting that down until they found appropriate indoor space. You might remember Yvo visiting as part of her Fried Chicken Feast a few months back (or her simple chicken biscuit at Madison Square Park’s Mark’t). She isn’t the only fan of fried chicken on the site, however, and as I’ve been making more and more at home, I’ve developed a bit of an idea about what I like. So when a friend had the night to himself to carouse in Brooklyn, I offered up Pies ‘n’ Thighs as a starting point for a belly full of good food.

We arrived around 6:30, not late enough to be laughably delayed by a ton of other people waiting for the opportunity to eat. The restaurant is nondescript to the point of not even having a real sign with their name on it. You can sort of see the hand-made sign in the window where the bench is — a bench that always seems to have people sitting on it, so the sign’s obscured anyway.

We were seated after a couple of minutes at one of the many mismatched tables in the front room — there’s a covered area in the back — and, well, you have to eat the fried chicken if you don’t eat here all the time, right?

We started off with the hush puppies, fried to perfection. The tartar sauce-like goo was interesting, but not really suited to the hush puppies I’d rather have seen honey butter, or nothing at all. Hot sauce makes them better, of course.

The chicken arrived quickly, fresh from the deep, deep fryer. Three pieces comprise the Chicken Box, and a biscuit and a side arrive alongside. I chose the mac and cheese, because I always seem to. Three good size pieces, a drumstick, thigh and breast, accompany a heaping scoop of the comfort-food staple, topped with a little hot sauce — Red Devil maybe? — and a comically-tall buttermilk biscuit.

We both ordered Arnold Palmers because, well, both the tea and lemonade are freshly-made, so why not? It tasted perfectly fine, and I’m pretty sure that’s about the only thing I’ll drink even though there’s a reasonable selection of beers as well. Chicken needs lemonade and sweet tea, after all.

These are straight-up fried chicken parts, not batter-fried, and it’s crisped wonderfully. There’s a bit of salt in the skin, and inside, even the breast drips juice. More on that later.

The mac and cheese? It’s hard to screw it up, and while the macaroni wasn’t cooked al dente, there’s a ton of cheese with which to contend, and it’s even better with hot sauce.

My friend had the chicken as well, opting instead for the cole slaw, which he loved. It’s minced, not shredded cabbage and onion and so forth, and not mayonnaise but vinegar, and he enjoyed it greatly. (Note he’s got two drumsticks and a breast.)

I sank my teeth into the drumstick first to get a sense of the taste. This… is… so… good! The meat has so much flavor and looks beautiful, too. That isn’t undercooked, that’s just excellent dark meat.

As I moved on to the breast, it remained tender and juicy, and the crispiness of the skin juxtaposed with the soft, tender meat made for interesting bites all the way through the meal. The chicken didn’t need hot sauce, but since it was on the table, of course I added it to the “extra” skin just to see.

Oh, right, the biscuit. It barely needs to be said that Pies ‘n’ Thighs knows their biscuits, and must use about a half-stick of butter per. Fluffy insides , crunchy outer shell, just beautiful. Alas, only one per meal. I suggest coming here with someone watching their carbohydrate intake.

We opted against ordering one of the dozen-plus pies in order to not have to be rolled out of there. It may not look like a lot of food, but trust me, it’s plenty.

I think it’s obvious I recommend Pies ‘n’ Thighs. Sure, there’s a hipster factor to overcome, but what in Williamsburg doesn’t have that? The meals are reasonably-priced, and honestly, try your best to save room for pie. Without pie, we each put down $20 or so for a meal (including tax and tip) that filled us up and tasted excellent. The hardest part of the whole experience is moving past the chicken to try the rest of the menu!


Cake Is The Only Thing That Matters

If you know me, you know that sandwiches are my favorite food (some people find this controversial, but it’s valid, the end). Every year I look for a new favorite sandwich of the year, and a few years ago I discovered the chicken biscuit from Pies n Thighs in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It’s a juicy piece of boneless fried chicken on a biscuit that’s been slathered with honey butter and doused in hot sauce. It is, in a word, glorious. I’ve been missing it since going gluten free, so I decided to try to recreate it without the gluten. And…
It was surprisingly easy, and tasted exactly like the real version! Even if you’ve never had the real thing, this is a great impressive meal to make, and you’ll be sorry when you’ve finished your last bite. (And if you want the glutens, just use regular breadcrumbs!)

Pies n Thighs Chicken Biscuit Recipe [Copycat version]
Ingredients for the Marinade
1 package boneless, skinless chicken thighs (mine had 4)
2 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons sriracha or other hot sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne
1 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp black pepper

Ingredients for Breading
3/4 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs
3/4 cup almond meal (if you’re making these with gluten, you can use all breadcrumbs, but I’d recommend using almond meal anyway as it adds a great flavor)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne
1 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/4 to 1/2 tsp amounts of any other dried herbs you like (I added some basil and oregano)
olive oil

Ingredients for Serving
gluten-free biscuits, rolls, or English muffins, halved and toasted (I recommend the Trader Joe’s French rolls)
4 tbsp salted butter, room temperature
2 tbsp honey
hot sauce of your choice (like Frank’s Red Hot or Cholula)

For the marinade: pour buttermilk into a large (non-metal) bowl. Add in hot sauce, mustard, salt, cayenne, paprika, and pepper and whisk together until well mixed. Set aside. Take your chicken thighs out of the package, trim any fat, and pound them out a bit thinner between pieces of plastic wrap. Submerge chicken in buttermilk mixture, making sure it’s completely covered, and let marinate in the fridge for at least 3 hours and up to 24, stirring things around once or twice.

When you’re ready to cook: in a large plate, mix together breadcrumbs, almond meal, salt, cayenne, thyme, pepper, garlic powder, and any other herbs with a fork until well distributed. Take each piece of chicken out of the buttermilk, let the excess drip off, and then dredge in crumb mixture until both sides are coated.

Heat enough olive oil to more than comfortably coat the bottom of your pan over medium heat. When it’s hot enough (toss in some breadcrumbs and they’ll sizzle), cook chicken–probably in batches of two so as not to overcrowd your pan–until browned on both sides and cooked through, about 5 minutes per side. (When flipping chicken, use a thin metal spatula to ensure that coating comes with the chicken.) While chicken cooks, mix together honey and butter in a small bowl until combined.

When ready to serve, divide honey butter between rolls. Top bottom half with chicken, douse with hot sauce to taste (more is better), and top with other half. Grab a lot of napkins, and dig in.


Pies-N-Thighs Fried Chicken Biscuits

We usually stay in on Valentine’s, but this year we had an even more legitimate reason to do so…House of Cards. Was Netflix doing the world a favor by letting us all spend February 14th binging on new episodes? I like to think so.

And, a few days before, I’d found the recipe for Pies-N-Thighs’ Chicken Biscuits, one of Jesse’s all time favorite foods. (Pies-N-Thighs, for those who don’t know, is a restaurant in Williamsburg that serves an array of amazing fried-chicken-and-biscuit combinations…and pie, of course).

It’s like the stars had aligned to make our Valentine’s day as blissfully decadent as possible. And what better way to show my love than by giving my husband a coronary delicious dinner.

As a very appreciative Jesse put it, “this recipe gets to your heart in more ways than one.” Continue reading &rarr

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Pies ‘n’ Thighs Alive and Kicking

Pies ‘n’ Thighs, the Chowhound-certified barbecue and bakery wedged into a Williamsburg bar, closed two years ago and found new, larger digs not far away. Then hungry fans waited. And waited. Finally the place is back in business, and evidently no worse for its prolonged hiatus.

“The cozy charm is still intact,” reports CalJack, “as are the crisp, flavorful pieces of chicken, the buttery biscuits, and the reasonable prices.” Porky collard greens are a standout side so are cold black-eyed peas, smoky and zesty with a touch of spice. The expanded menu includes a burger (made with beef from Brooklyn’s Meat Hook) a crisp, tasty “Big Salad” of beet, carrot, avocado, and hard-cooked egg over lettuce and a few once-occasional specials now promoted to the daily lineup, including the popular brisket sandwich.

Hounds approve of the house-baked bread, including a nutty, hearty multigrain the new space, especially the inviting back room and the short but well-chosen list of beers (two recent pours: India Pale Ale from Captain Lawrence in Westchester and the Belgian-style White Rascal from Avery in Colorado). No word yet on the signature pies, but sam1 has sampled the trail mix cookie and pronounces it “pretty damn excellent.”

Pies ‘n’ Thighs [Williamsburg]
166 S. Fourth Street (at Driggs Avenue), Brooklyn
347-529-6090


A Quest for New York’s Perfect Biscuit

A Southern biscuit is equal parts comfort and controversy, its quality, authenticity and very classification as a biscuit subject to dispute. Its most crucial ingredient is not flour, fat, leavening or liquid, but nostalgia. The biscuit you ate at your grandmother’s knee is the only biscuit there will ever be.

Nevertheless, a number of New York City chefs and bakers have decided in the last few years to devote themselves to the biscuit’s tricky art. Takeout shops and restaurants revolving around biscuits have opened in the East Village Williamsburg, Brooklyn and Astoria, Queens. Small-batch biscuits can be ordered online from independent bakers who may show up on your doorstep or send their husbands to deliver them.

Over the last month, I’ve sampled biscuits from nine of the newer vendors in town. No two were alike. In their array of sizes, flavors and textures, they were Rorschachs of buttermilk, revealing my prejudices: I tend to favor flaky middles over crispy bottoms, salty over sweet, and biscuits eaten straight, free of such interferences as honey or jam.

Biscuits are personal. Those who champion crunch, sweetness and slathering, please feel free to draw your own conclusions from my descriptions.

All the biscuits I tried shared the tang of buttermilk, and all but one were made with butter rather than lard or shortening. Consideration for (or fear of) vegetarians is partly to blame, although most bakers said they preferred the taste of butter. Some relied on White Lily flour, which is milled from soft winter wheat, has less protein and yields a lighter crumb. It’s a Southern staple that’s costly to secure northeast of the Mason-Dixon line.

As for the sorcery of their making, everyone I spoke with agreed: keep the ingredients as cold as the tomb. Touch them as little as possible. And don’t twist the biscuit cutter, which can hinder the rise.

At BeeHive Oven, which opened in Williamsburg last year, biscuits are served under a Texan flag pinned to the ceiling. Treva Chadwell, who runs the restaurant with her husband, John, grew up in South Texas, where her family goes back eight generations.

Her biscuits are an approximation of her grandmother’s, which were flat, with hard, browned bottoms. Ms. Chadwell’s are taller, sometimes nearly toppling, their slopes suggesting landslides of dough. They have amber lids and interiors that are somehow fluffy and dense at once, delicate yet robust enough to survive when stuffed with fried chicken or shrimp rémoulade.

Two blocks south of BeeHive Oven stands Pies ’n’ Thighs, a Southern restaurant born in the back room of a biker bar nine years ago and settled at its current address in 2010. (A second location opened in January on the Lower East Side.)

Sarah Sanneh, the head baker, comes from Corona del Mar, Calif. She has Southern roots, but her biscuit recipe was improvised, not inherited. It includes all-purpose flour cut with lower-gluten pastry flour, for airiness higher-fat European butter, frozen and chopped and a final brushing with egg and heavy cream.

The resulting biscuits are glories, faintly fissured along the sides, their tops and bottoms gilded like pie crust and close to goldenrod in color. They start to crumble at the touch. Inside, they have layers like a secret dossier. They’re best eaten moments out of the oven, when the liquid in the butter has gone up in steam but still hovers like a ghost.

Annie Etheridge, a 13th-generation south Virginian who can trace her mother’s family back to the Jamestown colonist John Rolfe, started selling her biscuits at street fairs a year ago under the name Field & Clover. Baked in a commissary kitchen in Harlem, they were some of the finest I tried, modest in height and gorgeously tender, with seams of tiny air pockets, internal layers like an Elizabethan ruff, and firm, burnished caps and bottoms. There’s not a trace of sugar in the dough.

Despite my purist bent, my favorites came with thoughtfully balanced fillings: Cheddar inside dough suffused with black pepper, popping like gunpowder homemade strawberry-peach jam, smooth and no sweeter than need be and dark chocolate, like a pain au chocolat, only with enough chocolate for every mouthful.

Liz Santiso of the Brooklyn Biscuit Company, a caterer and online shop, works out of a commissary kitchen in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. She’s a Connecticut Yankee married to an Oklahoman who dared her to make biscuits. It took her a year to come up with a recipe, partly in consultation with her grandmother-in-law, who used lard and White Lily flour. (Ms. Santiso opted instead for butter and King Arthur flour.)

Her biscuits are beautiful hulks that stay tender for days. The classic, baseline version comes with coarse grains of sea salt glittering on top. Another is tawny with chipotle powder and New York Cheddar, smoke in every cranny the heat keeps escalating, and lasts. Even better is one with staccatos of black pepper and goat cheese, which bring not so much a flavor as a sense of expansiveness.

At Root & Bone, which opened last year in the East Village, the biscuits are demure, almost the size of petits fours. Jeff McInnis, the chef, who grew up in Florida near the Alabama border, named them after his great-grandmother Daisy. They sink a little under the teeth and practically exhale butter. In Mr. McInnis’s slightly arch take on biscuits and gravy, they’re served with a dipping sauce of dark chicken jus, fortified with honey and accompanied by twigs of fresh thyme, sea salt and a swath of benne (sesame) seeds.

Sam Crocker, the chef at Burnside Biscuits, which opened in Astoria in July, is a fellow Floridian. He offers two biscuits, one with duck fat and butter, the other with butter alone, both monumentally salty and best addressed with jam or balanced, in a sandwich, by blackened catfish or fried oysters. A third iteration comes with an herb sauce rife with za’atar, a nod to the use of thyme and sumac in Southern cooking. It evokes revved-up Italian dressing.

Empire Biscuit, which opened in the East Village in 2013, has nothing to do with the original empire biscuit (a sort of Linzer torte sandwich cookie). The shop is open 24 hours a day, for “breakfast, lunch, dinner, drunk,” as the legend on the front window says. Jonathan Price, an owner, was born in Virginia and grew up in Florida.

His biscuits are sturdy but still intensely rich. He refuses to use sugar in the dough he believes that the biscuit should be a tangy, salty counterpart to something else. If someone asks for a plain biscuit (as I did), “I want to tell them, ‘At least put jam on it,’ ” he said. He’s right.

At Cheeky Sandwiches, which opened in 2009 on the Lower East Side, the chef, Din Yates, was born and raised in New Orleans. He uses both buttermilk and heavy cream, salt and sugar (“not a little, but enough”) and drops the dough on the tray. The result is satisfying, if not ethereal, a biscuit you can take a proper bite of.

The biscuits at Jacob’s Pickles, which opened on the Upper West Side in 2011, are laid in a sheet pan and cut into squares but left together so they bake nearly conjoined and retain more moisture. (The recipe was developed in the home kitchen of the restaurant’s owner, Jacob Hadjigeorgis, the son of Greek immigrants in Astoria.) They taste like cornbread minus the corn, close to cake and leaking butter, which stains everything they touch.

Fortunately, there’s room in the city for more than one person’s notion of a biscuit. Why not just praise their proliferation? Ms. Chadwell, whose little restaurant lies almost in the shadow of Pies ’n’ Thighs, thinks her neighbors’ food is delicious.


Blue Ribbon Biscuits

The sun was actually out this weekend, so Kramer and I were eager to get out of the house. We sat outside for an after-dinner drink with friends at Hot Bird, walked across the Williamsburg Bridge for dinner at Mission Chinese, and knocked back a few at The Drink and Pearl’s Social & Billy Club while donning our sweet shades. It was glorious. I think it’s supposed to rain tomorrow, but I’m fine with that as long as I can still have my windows open for a little bit. I was beginning to forget what this “fresh air” business was. Not that we weren’t breathing in tons of fumes as we crossed the East River on a foot bridge next to hundreds of cars and an above ground subway line, but I digress. Being outside is awesome and spring-slash-early summer in New York makes the bitterly cold winters 100% worth the pain and suffering. The only dark spot hovering over our nearly perfect weekend was that despite having gone to bed at 10:30 on Sunday (due to the aforementioned galavanting), our stupid upstairs neighbors locked themselves out again last night and decided to ring our doorbell at 3am in an attempt to get back into their apartment. WHY GOD WHY. WHY ME. They have done this one too many times and I may or may not be plotting my revenge. That revenge may take the form of ringing their doorbell at 8am on a Saturday, when they are all undoubtedly trying to sleep one off. Too bad, kids! Your downstairs neighbor will make you pay.

Try some leaf lard – it’s a life changer.

This post encompasses two awesome products I was recently sent: one is a Silpat, which is something I’ve always wanted and was so excited to receive. They’re expensive, yes, but I’m going to shell out for a second or third or fourth one so that I can use them always. They make a huge difference when baking, I have to say, plus they are re-usable and I am therefore not wasting countless rolls of parchment paper when I’m in the kitchen. The second is from Farm to People, which also sent me that maple syrup that I used in my recent lamb recipe. This time around, I’m using leaf lard, which is the purest form of rendered pork fat that you can use. It doesn’t have any porky flavor, so it gives anything you’re baking with it a clean flavor. At the same time, it has the richness of a fat, like butter, with almost the same rising properties of an oil, so your baked goods will be fluffy and perfect every time. I’m sold on it, to be honest, and while it probably isn’t something that I’ll have in my fridge at all times, I’m definitely going to make sure I use it when I’m whipping up something special. If you want to try out some of the good stuff for yourself, Farm to People is offering 25% off of your order when you use the code CoW25. Awesome, right? If you’re a baker and you’re not a vegetarian, I can’t recommend leaf lard enough. It’s amazing. I made one of my almond flour quiches (is quiches a word?) with it the other week, too, and the crust was just phenomenal. I can’t wait to make a pie crust with it.

So – yes, these are my Blue Ribbon Biscuits. The blue ribbon was awarded to me by me, and I think that’s just fine. I’ve made a lot of biscuits in my day, trying to find the most perfect one. It’s hard! It’s nearly impossible to get the level of pull-apart flaky goodness that you want in a biscuit. My favorite biscuits come from Pies ‘n’ Thighs in Brooklyn, but their recipe didn’t translate well for me at home. I probably over-mixed something. I usually attribute that kind of thing to user error, but also, I didn’t have leaf lard. I’m going to give this recipe a go with a butter and shortening combo soon, but for now, these are The Ones. Look at how flaky and fluffy and all around amazing they are. I found the key to unlock biscuit greatness on Cooking for Engineers, which is Kramer’s preferred cooking blog. The combination of pure pork fat, butter and gently folding the dough into thirds to make lots of layers is what sets these apart from any other biscuit. I was so pleased with myself after I pulled these from the oven. You should know that, despite what I kept trying to tell myself, you need to use a lot of dough to make the perfect biscuit. That means that 4 cups of flour and 3/4 cup of fat only yields 12 biscuits. Look, it’s worth it, I promise, and besides, actually making these guys doesn’t take that much effort. You don’t even need an electric mixer, which I suppose is how it should be if you’re making this classic Southern staple. Read the recipe carefully, fold your dough into thirds, fold it into thirds again, and then smother your best biscuits ever in butter, honey and jam.


Your ingredients.

Add your butter and lard to your flour mixture.

Then cut it in until coarse crumbs form.

Add in your milk and mix with a wooden spoon until a shaggy dough forms.

Then knead a little bit to bring it together. Form into two balls.

Roll out your first ball.

Then fold into an envelope one way, then again a second way to create nice layers.

Cut ’em out.

And bake until lightly golden.

Top with jam and butter.


Watch the video: Restaurant Review. Pies n Thighs (August 2022).