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Campbell’s Launches New Organic Soup Line, Souplicity

Campbell’s Launches New Organic Soup Line, Souplicity

“Simple is the new delicious”

The line is organic, non-GMO, and preservative-free.

Major companies, such as Pepsi and Coca-Cola, have been impacted by more health-conscious consumers, but Campbell’s is staying on trend with the release of its new line of organic soup, Souplicity.

Souplicity’s products are inspired by chefs, but have the convenience of being refrigerated, according to the company website.

"While more than half of consumers looking for foods that are both organic and made with simple, recognisable ingredients, there has been minimal innovation in the fresh refrigerated soup category to meet these demands," Todd Putman, general manager at Campbell's C-Fresh unit, told Just-Food. "With Souplicity, we're bringing bold flavours and variety to consumers who crave a fresh culinary twist on a classic."

The products in the line go through high-pressure processing, a method that kills bacteria without chemical preservatives and maintains the soup’s quality, Food Beast reported.

Souplicity currently has four flavors: Roasted Red Pepper Tomato Gouda, Carrot Curry Ginger, Broccoli Parmesan Lemon, and Corn Poblano Lime.

The soups come in 17.6-ounce containers and cost $5.99.


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Question: Reaching Millennials Through New Product Innovation At Campbell’s Soup What Is A Marketer To Do When Their Whole Product Category Is Shrinking? That’s The Situation Campbell’s Soup Found Itself In As Many Consumers Decided That Soup Was No Longer “mmm Mmm Good.”53 Campbell’s Soup Was A Pioneer Of Mass Food Manufacturing, Making “shelf-stable”.

Campbell’s Soup was a pioneer of mass food manufacturing, making “shelf-stable” (canned) goods a fixture in American pantries. But many of today’s consumers prefer a different approach to eating—seasonal, fresh, and organic. This is particularly true for America’s 80 million millennials, an important generation that Campbell’s and other soup makers were not attracting to their traditional canned soup products. To reconnect with this market segment, new CEO Denise Morrison took the 125-year-old company in some bold new directions, using a combination of internally driven product innovation and acquisitions of food industry trailblazers. 54

Job one was to understand what millennials want in food. For this research, Morrison sent Campbell’s employees to cities known as hipster hubs—Austin, Texas Portland, Oregon London and Paris—to learn about the preferences of these potential customers. This generation, they learned, is culturally diverse and globally connected. While they have college degrees, they also tend to be underemployed. This “dine-out” generation likes cuisines that were once considered exotic: Mexican, Indian, and Asian. Campbell’s vice president of consumer insights summed it up: “They go through life hunting out and gathering different experiences. They sample foods in the same way they sample jobs.” The Campbell’s team didn’t just ask customers what they wanted—they used a process of deep immersion, which involved executives eating meals with customers in their homes, looking in their pantries, and tagging along on trips to the supermarket. 55

Campbell’s also wanted to predict where food tastes would be headed in the future. For this task, the company interviewed chefs, nutritionists, and academics, but also experts of a different sort: designers, anthropologists, and futurists. Campbell’s learned not only what consumers may soon be eating, but how they want to buy their food. Technologies such as augmented/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and new kinds of currency will affect how food is purchased—both through mobile devices and brick-and-mortar retail. 56

Acquisitions were one route Campbell’s took to add to its product line. Garden Fresh Gourmet was a health-focused brand with a loyal following for its salsa and hummus. Now a Campbell’s brand, it provides customers with gourmet soups in sizes to feed a whole family. Bolthouse Farms, a seller of fresh carrots and refrigerated beverages, brought additional expertise and customers. To reach millennial parents, Plum Organics was added, bringing with it a food line for babies and toddlers. 57

These acquisitions helped address another finding of the research: the high priority placed on healthy, fresh food. Consumers were concerned about the levels of sodium and high fructose corn syrup in Campbell’s traditional soups. 58 The trend toward a preference for organic food also influenced the company’s innovation choices. Campbell’s launched an internally developed product, Go Soups, a premium-priced line of soups focused on freshness and packaged not in cans, but in plastic pouches designed to convey that freshness. 59 But Campbell’s has not kicked the can completely, offering its Well Yes! soups in a can, but without artificial ingredients. And Campbell’s Souplicity line uses high-pressure processing, allowing the product to retain its flavor and color without the use of preservatives. 60

This focus on health extends beyond products to education and a unique service offering. Campbell’s now offers a website and app, whatsinmyfood.com, that allows consumers to see details about the ingredients, where the food is sourced, and how it’s made. 61 Even more revolutionary is its acquisition of Habit, a start-up providing personalized diet recommendations. Customers send an at-home nutrition test kit to a certified lab and then receive a personalized diet alongPage 241with coaching from a nutritionist, all based on the consumer’s lifestyle, physiology, and health goals. 62

For a company accustomed to a few innovations each year, the new pace of product development is breathtaking—in one year, they planned to introduce 200 new products. 63 Not all are hits: a kit to make soup in Keurig coffeemakers was abandoned due to disappointing sales. 64 However, to keep pace with the changing priorities of millennials and all its customers, Campbell’s will likely have to keep up this aggressive rate of innovation, using additional acquisitions and continuous R&D to roll out more products and services.


Questions for Consideration

Campbell’s expanded its offerings through both its own R&D and by acquiring other companies and their products. What are the pros and cons of these two options? Which should be Campbell’s focus going forward?


Watch the video: Soup Campbell (January 2022).